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Monday, May 18, 2009

Fiddleheads - A New Experiment


"Fiddleheads are fantastic", she exclaimed. "Just steam them and then put some salt, pepper and vinegar on them, you will love them." they said. I believed, I bought, I steamed, I ate one.....not impressed. Maybe it was the preparation? Please assist. Please send me your favorite recipes/preparations and I will try them and post about your recipe. I want to like these curious looking fellows.

18 comments:

Lisa said...

I saw these at a produce market last week and was curious also. They look a little strange but if I knew how to prepare them I would get some.

Jennifer said...

You think they look strange, try showing them to a 3 an d 5 yr old

Megan said...

I tried some recently. They were on skewers with a piece of ham-like bacon and a cipollini onion. Even eating them with these other things, I did not enjoy them. I found the taste too green and earthy. I'm interested to see what sorts of recipes people recommend.

The Diva on a Diet said...

Sorry, I got nothin'! I, too, am intrigued ... but have not yet been brave enough to try cooking them ... much less eating them!

Will await further positive evidence before I take the plunge! LOL

duodishes.com said...

Never had a fiddlehead. They just look kinda scary. :)

Spryte said...

LOL... more nothing from me too... I tried them a couple of years ago because they looked cool and wasn't impressed... I'll also be watching for recipes!

5 Star Foodie said...

Oh, dear. I'm a little worried now. Fiddleheads was another new ingredient I picked up at Wegmans this weekend. I haven't made anything yet but planning to. I'll let you know how mine turn out even if I don't end up blogging about it. Wish me luck.

Mary said...

Jennifer, unless you are able to find the fiddleheads in the wild their expense is bound to make them disappointing. We eat them because ours are free. Whatever, preparation you use be forewarned this in an earthy tasting. So, weather you boil or stem they must be well cooked and then sauced. My favorite prep is to marinate them in a lovely lemon based salad dressing and then serve them cold.

girlichef said...

[crickets chirping] I don't have any suggestions either. I've only cooked them a couple of times and that was years ago (at work)...I don't even remember how we prepared them. I'll be on the look-out, though :)

Nicole said...

Oooh, I may have to try these! I see everyone is less than excited about them but as a Raw foodie these may be quite interesting:) Thanks for the idea! I'll let you know.

Caitlin said...

My thought would be lots of olive oil, garlic and lemon juice. That works with just about everything!

And maybe have a drink before you eat the fiddleheads...I find everything/one much more agreeable after a good martini!

http://featured.chefmom.com/2009/04/21/cooking-with-fiddleheads-and-fiddlehead-recipes/

Chef E said...

Oh, I must have missed this, as I have been so busy...

I left a comment for you, but I made this dish a week ago, and just had not posted, and I try and get to all the feeds I get...my friend bought some too and I told her how to prepare them, and she loved it! She had not seen, or the market workers before...Hubby loves them, so I try and cook them each year, since we had them years ago in a restaurant in Maine...

Chef E said...

Oh, my friend made them with Dijon, soy and onions, then used the same sauce for her main course, Salmon...

Soma said...

what are these? I have never seen them, let along trying!
Soma(www.ecurry.com)

Jennifer said...

Chef E: so funny asthe couple that swore to me that they are great, are form Maine! Like I said, I and other blogger are working on recieps that show aprecaition to the fiddlehead.

Robyn said...

Is fiddlehead a little bit slimy? I think in Japanese it is called warabi, and I like it in this kind of salad: http://archives.starbulletin.com/2002/04/10/features/story5.html

I think the onion and sesame oil are key. Kamaboko (pink and white fishcake) is good too, although I have a hard time finding a good one in Michigan.

Tangled Noodle said...

I have a growing list of produce that I've seen posted all over the blogosphere and which I've never seen in any local stores, much less tasted. Wish I could help!

Karey said...

Ok - I'm behind... are these fiddlehead FERNS.. if so I have SO many of them in the woods. I'd be willing to pick & try, but only with a heavy dose of lemon, salt & maybe white wine (like brussel sprouts).

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